The Christmas Lay-Offs





The last week before Christmas.

I went to the corner store and spent $20 on cheap decorations so the learners could help me decorate. We did up a blue and gold theme this year, with a fir wreath and home-made snowflakes.



We took time during our last class to play Upwords and S'math (a scrabble-type math game), eat chocolates and drink water. (Not fancy, but the company was lovely.)


Some of us traded cards. (I'd brought three packs of Christmas cards in a couple of weeks back so I could help anyone who wasn't sure about spelling or addressing or any of those other conventions.)


We listened to Christmas music streamed in from multiply.com. (From some guy's site in Hungary. I thanked him in English. He replied in Hungarian. It was all a bit mysterious, but the music was nice.)

Then we said our goodbyes for the holidays.

And then I picked up my lay-off slip and went home.




(Stopping by the Credit Union on the way to see how much I had in savings to get me through the next four weeks.)



*snivel*


3 comments:

Anonymous said...

wendell - your idea to do christmas cards makes me feel embarrassed, that i didn't think of doing that. my excuse must be that i don't send cards myself, any more - since email took precedence - so: it never occurred to me to think that my students might want to send cards. sounds a bit lame, but it's true.

i remember you writing about the layoff, last year. i was surprised that you are expected to live, without work and income.

this year, however,it is MY turn to snivel, since i was told at our staff christmas lunch, that we are ALL being made redundant this year, as our organisation closes down all of it's training arm, across the country. no amount of good work done, nor goals met, nor improved figures/balance sheets/ results makes any difference to the situation, now.

on the plus side, there is plenty of notioce. but it sure doesn't FEEL good.

Wendell said...

Wow! Across the whole country!

In one sense you're right: "no amount of good work done, nor goals met, nor improved figures/balance sheets/ results makes any difference to the situation."

On the other hand, there's nothing they can do that will undo the good work and improvements you and your learners have already achived.

That's what gets me through a lot of dark days - no matter what they do, they can't take away the seeds I've planted, the hope I've installed, the skills I've helped build, the good things I've done.

Here's to better times!

Anonymous said...

that's a good perspective: thanks for that.