Storytent Notes


Yay for little notebooks! We take them with us to Storytents. That's how we record things like who comes to the tent, how many books get borrowed or returned, how many books this or that child reads, the weather and location, and anything else we find interesting. Stuff like this:

Cheryl reads to Girl, again - then today, spontaneously, girl offers to read Where's Spot to Cheryl. Shows every indication that she sees ST as a safe place, and has put reading into her quality world.
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Boy reading Witch Witch, capitalizing on its predictability. I hadn't thought of it as an easy read, but it is no different than Brown Bear Brown Bear in that respect.
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Girl reading Lady With The Alligator Purse to Cheryl. Bit of a struggle for her. I notice that all the child-led reading going on is possible because we're having a "slow day" - lower numbers can mean higher quality.
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Three boys follow another into the tent by a minute. They look boisterous and uncertain at the same time. Cheryl asks, "Have you guys come to ST before?"

One boy says, "I'm going to read a baby book."

"Okay," says Cheryl, as if it were the most natural thing in the world - which it is to us.

But he was expecting a different response. "Really?" He grabs a board book version of Where's My Cat and reads it. Then he spies Monster at the End of this Book. "Oh! I remember this book."

Meantime, Cheryl hands another boy That's Disgusting. He reads it aloud - each page bringing hoots of laughter (especially when they change the text to "That's awesome").

A third boy picks up Monster at the End of this Book, saying "I'm just going to look at the pictures." We shrug (wondering, of course, about his reading level). His friend has moved on to the board book version of Hug.

They continue reading and looking, occasionally identifying a book from their past, until one boy says, "Hey! I've read eight books already." Then a parent arrives home (across the street) and the four leave. "Good bye." "Good bye."
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"Spiderman!" he cried. He picked up all three and looked through them briefly. Then, he set them aside and picked up Crews' Truck. He 'read' himself a story (the book is wordless) and then ran home to pee.
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Mom stands on stoop, yells boys name. He runs outside the tent and stands up where she can see him. "I'm over here!"
Mom yells back, "Get over... Okay. Go. Go."
Us: Did you forget to tell your mom you were going to Storytent?
Him: Yeah.
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Two boys are reading dual copies of the level 'A' book I Am. They seem eager to show off their reading skills. They want to be readers. Another boy looking at Frog and Toad. I ask, "Do you want me to read that to you?" Casually, "No, I can read it." He's a boy confident in his reading. Down the street, yesterday, we were throwing out boys for hoarding books. Boys like to read.
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Mom started to look through the quickreads, but her kids kept taking her attention away. Even looking at quickreads can be too time consuming for some parents.
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Dad comes to tell us, "The book was in my car, and the car was stolen last night. The car was recovered, but it was torched, so...."
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I ask, "Am I reading or are you reading?" He says, "I can read it." He mumbles, "Mummer... mummer... mummer... chicka boom boom! Mummer... mummer... up the tree! Chicka boom boom!" Pauses to say, "My sister's reading a different book. I'm reading this one." Yes you are!
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Six year old boy to Cheryl, "I didn't even know you were here. I called you yesterday morning. I even left a message." Cheryl says, "But you didn't leave a number or say who you were!"
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So, there you have it. Girls appreciate safe places to read. Parents rarely have time to even look at adult books. Beware of leaving your book in a car. Remember to leave your name and number. Oh, and boys....

They like to read, like to read, like to read.

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